Warning: Declaration of ET_WC_Product_Variable_TB_Placeholder::get_available_variations() should be compatible with WC_Product_Variable::get_available_variations($return = 'array') in /home/texastr6/public_html/wp-content/themes/Divi/includes/builder/module/helpers/WooCommerceModules.php on line 837

Warning: Cannot modify header information - headers already sent by (output started at /home/texastr6/public_html/wp-content/themes/Divi/includes/builder/module/helpers/WooCommerceModules.php:837) in /home/texastr6/public_html/wp-includes/feed-rss2.php on line 8
Texas Trail Roundup http://texastrailroundup.org Saddle Up! Tue, 25 Feb 2020 11:57:54 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.5.1 118749875 The Unique Ceramic Trail Markers in Brackenridge Park http://texastrailroundup.org/2020/02/25/unique-ceramic-trail-markers-brackenridge-park/ Tue, 25 Feb 2020 12:00:36 +0000 http://texastrailroundup.org/?p=1408 You may have noticed the unusual trail markers in Brackenridge Park. The eastern part of the park has four wooded trails, each about a mile long. The  markers at the trailheads are by Susan Budge, who at the time of the trail markers’ creation in 2006 was the head of the ceramics department at San […]

The post The Unique Ceramic Trail Markers in Brackenridge Park appeared first on Texas Trail Roundup.

]]>
You may have noticed the unusual trail markers in Brackenridge Park. The eastern part of the park has four wooded trails, each about a mile long. The  markers at the trailheads are by Susan Budge, who at the time of the trail markers’ creation in 2006 was the head of the ceramics department at San Antonio College. She has since retired and moved to Houston.

The marker pictured above is called Quercus, the Latin genus for the oak. The hollow space in the center is in the shape of an acorn.

The blue marker is called Waterworks and represents a flowing stream of water. Anaqua, in burnt orange, is a vertical bird head, pointing towards the sky, with a hollow eye and small anaqua seed in the its mouth. The anaqua tree (Ehretia anacua) is also known as  “Nockaway”, “Knackaway”, “Manzanita”, “Sandpaper Tree”, and “Sugarberry.”.  Old time Texans found the hard, dense wood handy for making tool handles, wheel spokes, axles and yokes. The small sweet berries were good for making jelly, and the stiff, rough leaves were useful for sanding wood.  Native Americans living in the vicinity supposedly used the leaves to smooth their arrow shafts.

To the right in the photo of the trail markers there is a little faux bois (concrete that mimics wood) hut made by Dionicio Rodriguez

Also in Brackenridge Park you will come across a sculpture called Glorieta, made of cast bronze and natural tree-trunk slices. Glorieta is Spanish for traffic circle.  The name also refers to “La Gloria,” or “heaven,” in Spanish. Also installed in 2006, it is by Ann Wallace.

The post The Unique Ceramic Trail Markers in Brackenridge Park appeared first on Texas Trail Roundup.

]]>
1408
Árbol de la Vida: Did You See it Saturday? http://texastrailroundup.org/2020/02/23/arbol-de-la-vida-did-you-see-it-saturday/ Sun, 23 Feb 2020 17:47:14 +0000 http://texastrailroundup.org/?p=3156 The Texas Trail Roundup Saturday walks took you through the mission trails. Did you see the Árbol de la Vida? It has a story to tell. In the Spring of 2017, San Antonians from all walks of life gathered to share their stories and, over the course of two years, their stories were transformed into […]

The post Árbol de la Vida: Did You See it Saturday? appeared first on Texas Trail Roundup.

]]>
The Texas Trail Roundup Saturday walks took you through the mission trails. Did you see the Árbol de la Vida? It has a story to tell.

In the Spring of 2017, San Antonians from all walks of life gathered to share their stories and, over the course of two years, their stories were transformed into clay structures that now hang from the massive Árbol de la Vida – tree of life – just off a trail between the San Antonio River and Mission Espada. The tree is based on the Mexican craft tradition inspired by personal and spiritual tales.

The artist behind the project is Margarita Cabrera. The piece is 40 feet tall and 80 feet across, and it holds 700 ceramic sculptures made by community members. The little ones were mostly made by elementary and middle school children. The largest weighs about 500 pounds. It was unveiled in May, 2019.

In Mexico, these tees were originally made to illustrate Bible stories but evolved to tell family stories. The stories in this massive Árbol tell the stories of the ranching families that lived and still live in the area around the mission.

The post Árbol de la Vida: Did You See it Saturday? appeared first on Texas Trail Roundup.

]]>
3156
Our Very Cultured Pearl: the Hippest Place in Town http://texastrailroundup.org/2020/02/23/the-pearl/ Sun, 23 Feb 2020 13:25:03 +0000 http://texastrailroundup.org/?p=687 Sunday’s walks will took you through The Pearl, one of the trendiest spots in San Antonio. We’ve scheduled the start times so that you will hit it about the time the farmer’s market opens: 10AM-2PM, rain or shine. This is a producers-only farmer’s market. All Pearl Farmer’s Market vendors are located within 150 mile radius […]

The post Our Very Cultured Pearl: the Hippest Place in Town appeared first on Texas Trail Roundup.

]]>
Sunday’s walks will took you through The Pearl, one of the trendiest spots in San Antonio. We’ve scheduled the start times so that you will hit it about the time the farmer’s market opens: 10AM-2PM, rain or shine.

This is a producers-only farmer’s market. All Pearl Farmer’s Market vendors are located within 150 mile radius of San Antonio and provide fresh, local, and seasonal products that they themselves planted, raised, and harvested. You can also breakfast on prepared foods: crepes and gluten-free pastries from CrepeLandia; gluten and sugar-free pastries from Grain Free Haven; Mexican baked goods from Sol y Luna Baking Company or Empanadas from Yapa Artisan Empanadas. There are some tables where you can sit, sip a cup of coffee, tea, kombucha or a fermented yogurt,  listen to music and people watch.

You’ll quickly figure out that The Pearl was once the Pearl Brewery, which was bought by Pabst and ceased operation there in 2001. Beer drinkers should note that Pearl beer was formulated and first brewed in Bremen, Germany, by the Kaiser–Beck Brewery, which produces Beck’s beer. Pearl beer’s name came from Kaiser–Beck’s brewmeister, who thought the foamy bubbles in a freshly poured glass of the brew resembled sparkling pearls. In Germany, the brew was called “Perle”. When brought to the United States, the spelling was changed to English: Pearl. In 1886, the first bottles and wooden kegs of American Pearl beer rolled off the line and into local tap rooms. It’s still being made: in Fort Worth.

In 2002 the 23-acre site was purchased by Kit Goldsbury’s Silver Ventures (he was the CEO of Pace Picante Sauce and made a bundle when it was sold to Campbell’s.) The transformation of the abandoned brewery into one of the hippest spots in town has won international accolades. Best of all, it’s green. Pearl is registered with the Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design (LEED) green building rating system  – one of the most stringent measures of sustainability in the world – and achieved Gold Level certification for the Full Goods and CIA Buildings. In the breezeway of the The Full Goods Building there is a learning lab for environmental initiatives which includes a 200-kilowatt solar installation, generating one-fourth of the building’s energy and rainwater collected and stored in recycled beer cisterns to supplement irrigation of the environmentally responsible, natural, low water use landscape.

The Pearl rightly bills itself as a culinary destination.  It’s home to the third U.S. campus (along with Hyde Park, New York and Napa Valley, California) of The Culinary Institute of America (our campus concentrates on the food traditions of Central and South America.) There are a dozen or so very, very good restaurants and a similar number of cafes and bars. Local Coffee has fantastic brew; so does Southerleigh, a brew PUB. You can get Mexican street food at La Gloria, vegetarian food at Green, or hand-crafted cured foods, from charcuterie to pickles, at Cured. If you have a hankering for Peruvian-Asian fusion, try Botika; or treat yourself to breakfast at Supper, the restaurant in the trés posh Hotel Emma. There is also fine shopping, and some very nifty apartments. It’s a very cultured Pearl.

 

 

 

The post Our Very Cultured Pearl: the Hippest Place in Town appeared first on Texas Trail Roundup.

]]>
687
When the Saints Came Marching In http://texastrailroundup.org/2020/02/22/saints-came-marching/ Sat, 22 Feb 2020 14:57:22 +0000 http://texastrailroundup.org/?p=966 The post When the Saints Came Marching In appeared first on Texas Trail Roundup.

]]>

The five San Antonio missions got their names from saints and benefactors: who were these men and women who left their names on our landscape? Saint Anthony, by the way, is considered to be the finder of lost things. So, if you get lost during the Texas Trail Roundup you can recite this traditional verse and call upon San Antonio himself to help you find your way:

Tony, Tony, look around.
Something’s lost and must be found!

The Alamo
The Alamo
Alamo

Mission San Antonio de Valero (The Alamo)

In 1716 Franciscan Missionaries received approval from Balthazar Manuel de Zuniga y Guzman Sotomayor y Sarmiento, second son of the Duke of Bejar and the Marqués de Valero, recently appointed viceroy of New Spain, for a plan close the dwindling mission of San Francisco Solano, founded in 1700 near the right bank of the Rio Grande, and move the mission to San Antonio. Hence the de Valero part of the name.

San Antonio was given its name on June 13, 1691, because that was the feast day of St. Anthony of Padua — and the day that a Spanish expedition came to the river they called Rio San Antonio.

La Segunda Compañía Volante de San Carlos del pueblo del Alamo, a company of one hundred Spanish Colonial mounted lancers, originally from a small town called San Jose y Santiago del Alamo in Coahuila, Mexico, arrived in Texas in early 1803 to bolster the existing San Antonio garrison. Their name soon was shortened to “El Alamo,” and the former mission where they were stationed also took on the name.

A rival theory is that the name arrived from the many cottonwood trees that were found along the banks of the San Antonio River; these Plane trees were known as Alamo in Spanish. Alamo historian Bruce Winders notes, “Commerce Street was once known as Alameda because of the cottonwood trees that lined it.”

Mission Concepcion

Mission Nuestra Señora de la Purísima Concepción de Acuña

This mission was first named and founded in East Texas on July 7, 1716 as Nuestra Señora de la Purísima Concepción de los Hainais, after the Native Americans who inhabited the area. It was moved to San Antonio on March 5, 1731.

Nuestra Señora de la Purísima Concepción translates as “Our Lady of the Immaculate Conception,” and refers to the Roman Catholic belief that Mary, Mother of Jesus, was herself born pure and without sin. Her feast day is December 8. Since a Papal Bull in 1643, Mary Immaculate has been the patron saint of the “New World.” Columbus’ ship that we generally call “The Santa Maria” had as its full name “La Santa María de la Immaculada Concepción.”

The de Acuña came from Juan de Acuña y Bejarano, 2nd Marquis of Casa Fuerte, who was the Spanish Viceroy from 1722 until his death in 1734.

Mission San Jose
San Jose Mission Interior

Mission San José y San Miguel de Aguayo

Permission to build a mission on this site was granted on January 22, 1720 in a decree issued by José de Azlor y Virto de Vera, Marqués de San Miguel de Aguayo, who was the governor of Coahuila and Texas.

In the Roman Catholic Tradition, Saint Joseph (San José) is the husband of Mary, mother of Jesus. His feast day is celebrated March 19. Saint Michael the Archangel (San Miguel) is seen by Catholics as the protector and the leader of the army of God against the forces of evil. His feast day, September 29, is also known as Michaelmas, or the feast of the Archangels.

Mission San Juan
Mission San Juan interior

Mission San Juan Capistrano

The San Antonio Missions were founded by Franciscans, so it is no surprise that they re-named this mission, which moved from East Texas on March 5, 1731, after Saint John of Capistrano, a Franciscan friar and Catholic priest who earned himself the nickname “the Soldier Saint” when in 1456, at age 70, he led a crusade against the invading Ottoman Empire at the siege of Belgrade (now the capital of Serbia.) He was made a saint in 1734, so he would have been a popular and contemporary choice.

Mission Espada
Mission Espada Interior

Mission San Francisco de la Espada

Originally founded as Mission San Francisco de los Tejas near Augusta, Texas, this mission was moved to San Antonio in 1731, the same time as Mission Concepcion. Named after Saint Francis of Assisi, the founder of the order that built San Antonio’s missions, no one seems to know why is was tagged de la Espada — of the Sword — although legend relates that a statue of the saint in the chapel might have at one time grasped a sword.

The post When the Saints Came Marching In appeared first on Texas Trail Roundup.

]]>
966
Spanish Governor’s Palace http://texastrailroundup.org/2020/01/15/spanish-governors-palace/ Wed, 15 Jan 2020 13:45:45 +0000 http://texastrailroundup.org/?p=769 Built in the 1740s, the Spanish Governor’s Palace (105 Plaza de Armas, across the parking lot form City Hall)  was a military fortification and a home for the Spanish Captain of the Presidio San Antonio de Béjar. In 1804 the last captain, José Menchaca, sold the compound to a prominent merchant and land owner. He […]

The post Spanish Governor’s Palace appeared first on Texas Trail Roundup.

]]>
Built in the 1740s, the Spanish Governor’s Palace (105 Plaza de Armas, across the parking lot form City Hall)  was a military fortification and a home for the Spanish Captain of the Presidio San Antonio de Béjar. In 1804 the last captain, José Menchaca, sold the compound to a prominent merchant and land owner. He and his descendants lived in the house for the next half century, during which time Mexico won its independence from Spain, the Republic of Texas was established and Texas became the 28th state. After the Civil War, the original families left downtown San Antonio for more fashionable neighborhoods and the Palace went through a decline.  It was a barber shop, a pawn shop, the “Hole-in-the-Wall Saloon (featuring nickle beer), a grocery, and many other businesses.

In the 1915, pioneer preservationist Adina De Zavala recognized the words año 1749 se acabo, carved in the keystone and realized the gem she had discovered. She began a 15-year campaign to have it restored. The City of San Antonio purchased the historic property in 1929 and completed the restoration in 1930 during the height of the Spanish Colonial Revival movement. It was never a palace and no governor ever lived there, but the plaques embedded in the walls tell a romanticized, albeit inaccurate story of the building’s history. It’s a lovely building, with a delightful courtyard and well worth a visit.

The Legend of the Doors
The doors were carved in 1930 by Swiss woodcarver Peter Mansbendel, who later  carved the huge front doors at Mission San José. Beginning at the top of the right-hand door and reading downward, the three seashells represent Columbus’ three ships that crossed the ocean facing many dangers (represented by the dragons) in search of the infant country (baby face) we now call America. They brought their arms and shields for protection and found a land of flowers and resources such as gold, silver, and spices. They also found the Maya, Inca, and Aztec Empires (Native American face). Moving to the bottom of the left-hand door and reading upward, we see the Spanish conquistadores who came to this land of paradise. With their weapons and shields they conquered all the dangers (dragons), including the many Indian tribes (medicine man mask), and returned to their homeland across the ocean (seashells).

The Spanish Governor’s Palace is closed Mondays and open Tuesday- Saturday, 9 a.m. – 5 p.m. and Sundays, 10 a.m. – 5 p.m. Admission is $5; $3 for seniors citizens. You’ll walk past it on the Friday Friendship Walks. Peek in the windows next door — it’s a city-owned art venue called the Culture Commons. Through May 2020 the gallery has a free exhibit of the works of Sebastian, who has more than 100 works being exhibited throughout they city, also through May.

 

The post Spanish Governor’s Palace appeared first on Texas Trail Roundup.

]]>
769
Texas Trail Roundup Medal Revealed http://texastrailroundup.org/2019/10/20/texas-trail-roundup-medal-revealed/ Mon, 21 Oct 2019 02:10:00 +0000 http://texastrailroundup.org/?p=2587 Isn’t it beautiful? Texas Trail Roundup President Susan Medlin revealed the our medal at the U.S. Freedom Walk Festival in Arlington, Virginia this weekend. Here’s how it works. If you sign up for any Saturday or Sunday walk you will be awarded one medal, plus a bar that clips onto the ribbon indicating the year, […]

The post Texas Trail Roundup Medal Revealed appeared first on Texas Trail Roundup.

]]>
Isn’t it beautiful? Texas Trail Roundup President Susan Medlin revealed the our medal at the U.S. Freedom Walk Festival in Arlington, Virginia this weekend.

Here’s how it works.

If you sign up for any Saturday or Sunday walk you will be awarded one medal, plus a bar that clips onto the ribbon indicating the year, 2020. We will be issuing this medal EVERY year: you get the medal only the first year you walk. In subsequent years, you will get a beautiful enamel pin that displays the year of that event and an image of an iconic San Antonio landmark. You’ll pin that onto the ribbon.

If you only walk on Friday you will not be awarded the medal, but they will be available for purchase on site for $10.00.

Here’s what it looks like when worn:

The post Texas Trail Roundup Medal Revealed appeared first on Texas Trail Roundup.

]]>
2587
San Antonio’s Chili Queens (and Frito Pie!) http://texastrailroundup.org/2019/09/04/san-antonios-chili-queens-and-frito-pie/ Wed, 04 Sep 2019 13:26:08 +0000 http://texastrailroundup.org/?p=334 From the 1860s until the late 1930s, both visitors and locals enjoyed the food and entertainment offered in the plazas of San Antonio by the Chili Queens. These women served chili con carne and other Mexican American foods from dusk until dawn at the San Antonio plazas — setting up tables and benches and bringing […]

The post San Antonio’s Chili Queens (and Frito Pie!) appeared first on Texas Trail Roundup.

]]>
From the 1860s until the late 1930s, both visitors and locals enjoyed the food and entertainment offered in the plazas of San Antonio by the Chili Queens.

These women served chili con carne and other Mexican American foods from dusk until dawn at the San Antonio plazas — setting up tables and benches and bringing pots of food to cook or reheat over mesquite fires and to serve by the light of oil lanterns. Wandering musicians and singers provided a festive air.

Visiting writers such as Stephen Crane, author of The Red Badge of Courage, were charmed by the Chili Queens. He recalled in 1895 that “upon one of the plazas, Mexican vendors with open-air stands sell food that tastes exactly like pounded fire-brick from Hades — chili con carne, tamales, enchiladas, chili verde, frijoles.”

O. Henry, who visited San Antonio in the 1880s and 1890s, wrote in his short story, The Enchanted Kiss, that “the nightly encampments upon the historic Alamo Plaza, in the heart of the city, had been a carnival, a saturnalia that was renowned throughout the land.”

Originally, diners found the Chili Queen tables in the city’s first marketplace, Military Plaza, but only until City Hall was built there in 1889. The Chili Queens moved to Market Square and, after the city built the Municipal Market House in the square in 1900, they moved west to Haymarket Plaza and Milam Park, near Commerce and Santa Rosa streets.

The chili stands were closed by the City Council at various times over the years for sanitary reasons, but public outcry would soon cause them to reopen. Slowly, the number of Chili Queens dwindled, and finally, in the early 1940s, the City Health Department closed their stands permanently because they deemed the dishwashing methods unsanitary.

If you want to try “a bowl of red” visit either Pico de Gallo in Market Square or at Mi Tierra in El Mercado. Both are with walking distance of the event hotel.

But the REAL heirs  to the Chili Queens are San Antonio’s food trucks. And a chili delicacy invented in San Antonio is the Frito Pie. You can combine both traditions at the Chamoy City Limits, a food truck parked at Lion’s Field (2809 Broadway, at the intersection of Mulberry) on Saturdays from 1:00pm until 7:00 pm. They also serve raspas (flavored shaved ice) that included Chamoy (a sour/sweet/spicy/salty condiment derived from pickled fruit, chili peppers, sugar and citrus.)

Some other places to get your Frito Pie fix are the B&D Ice House (1004 S Alamo, in the King William District); The Esquire Tavern (155 E. Commerce, near the Alamo) or Sam’s Burger Joint (330 E. Grayson, near the Pearl.)

So what is a Frito pie? It’s Frito corn chips (d’oh) topped with chili, shredded cheese and usually onions. The “authentic” version is served out of the Fritos bag but it’s fine to eat it out of a bowl.

frito-pie

The post San Antonio’s Chili Queens (and Frito Pie!) appeared first on Texas Trail Roundup.

]]>
334
The Alamo: John Wayne Has a Lot to Answer For http://texastrailroundup.org/2019/08/26/the-alamo-john-wayne-has-a-lot-to-answer-for/ Mon, 26 Aug 2019 13:58:19 +0000 http://texastrailroundup.org/?p=235 Here in San Antonio we get a kick out of visitors who ask, “where is the Alamo?” — and they are standing right in front of it! In the iconic 1960 John Wayne movie of that name his first view of the Alamo is across the dry Texas plains. Even in 1836, the Alamo was […]

The post The Alamo: John Wayne Has a Lot to Answer For appeared first on Texas Trail Roundup.

]]>
Here in San Antonio we get a kick out of visitors who ask, “where is the Alamo?” — and they are standing right in front of it!

In the iconic 1960 John Wayne movie of that name his first view of the Alamo is across the dry Texas plains. Even in 1836, the Alamo was located in what then passed for the inner city. And Texas isn’t in the desert — you’ll be surprised how GREEN our beautiful city is.  The 1960 Alamo Movie was filmed on a full-scale replica of the mission and the surrounding city in Brackettville, Texas, 128 miles (206 km) due west from San Antonio, not far from what is now the Mexican border.

This current aerial photo will give you a better idea of what to expect in  2016: that little speck surrounded by trees in the center of the photo is the Alamo. Our walk on Friday will walk right by the Alamo: don’t miss it!

alamo2

This post has been updated for the 2019 Texas Trail Roundup.

The post The Alamo: John Wayne Has a Lot to Answer For appeared first on Texas Trail Roundup.

]]>
235
Japanese Tea Garden Walk, 23 November, 2019 http://texastrailroundup.org/2019/08/18/tea-garden-2019/ Sun, 18 Aug 2019 18:20:16 +0000 http://texastrailroundup.org/?p=2733 The post Japanese Tea Garden Walk, 23 November, 2019 appeared first on Texas Trail Roundup.

]]>

DISTANCES: 10km/5km (6.2mi/3.1mi) The trails are rated 2A and are not suitable for wheelchairs or strollers. This is a lovely walk in the Tea Garden, Brackenridge Park, and Trinity University. The weather should be great at this time of year. Lunch is available at the café starting at 10 am

STARTING POINT: Japanese Tea Garden, 3853 North St. Mary’s, San Antonio TX 78212. Please park behind the Tuesday Musical Club and walk to the Japanese Tea Gardens.

START AND FINISH TIMES:Start between 8AM-11AM. Finish by 2PM.

SPECIAL PROGRAMS: Bridges – Spanning the USA | Carousels Across America | Doin’ The Louisiana Purchase | Make a Wish at a Water Fountain. The carousel The Kiddie Park — until recently at the corner of Broadway and Mulberry — is being moved to the forecourt of the Zoo in Brackenridge Park. You will pass it during your walk. The “Zootennienial” carousel is in the zoo and should you wish to view or ride it, you will need to pay zoo admission ($14.99.)

REGISTRATION & FEES: The fee for all participants is $3.00. There is no pre-registration and there are no refunds.

ELIGIBILITY/TYPE OF EVENT: These are non-competitive events. Walk, jog or run at your own pace. It is open to all and families are encouraged to participate. Children under age 12 must be accompanied by an adult. Everyone participating MUST register and carry a Start card and mail it in at the FINISH.

WATER & RESTROOMS: Restrooms and water are available at the starting point.

DISCLAIMER: The sponsors are not liable for accidents, thefts, and/or material damage. Reasonable effort has been made by the sponsors to make this a safe, enjoyable and memorable event.

 

WHAT YOU SEE ON THE WALK

The Unique Ceramic Trail Markers in Brackenridge Park

The Unique Ceramic Trail Markers in Brackenridge Park

You may have noticed the unusual trail markers in Brackenridge Park. The eastern part of the park has four wooded trails, each about a mile long. The  markers at the trailheads are by Susan Budge, who at the time of the trail markers' creation in 2006 was the head of...

read more
Sunken Garden Theater: The Other Half of the Quarry

Sunken Garden Theater: The Other Half of the Quarry

Yesterday we wrote about the Japanese Tea Gardens, which were constructed in an abandoned quarry that bisected Brackenridge Park. Actually, the Gardens only took up half the quarry. The other half -- the northern part -- is now the Sunken Garden Theater.When the Tea...

read more
The Faux Bois of San Antonio

The Faux Bois of San Antonio

Throughout the city of San Antonio you will find the work of Dionicio Rodriguez, carried on by his great nephew, Carlos Cortés: Faux Bois, or, false wood. In Mexico it is often referred to as trabajero rustico (rustic work) but it all means the same thing: concrete...

read more
Simply Beautiful: The Japanese Tea Garden

Simply Beautiful: The Japanese Tea Garden

It wasn't always beautiful. In 1915, the new San Antonio Parks Commissioner, Ray Lambert, embraced the “modern” ideal of healthier urban environments for the wealthy and working class alike. His grand idea was to create a park near downtown by connecting a 199-acre...

read more
A Walk through Academia: Trinity University

A Walk through Academia: Trinity University

Sunday'sTexas Trail Roundup 21k walk will take you through the campus of Trinity University, located between Brackenridge Park and the historic Monte Vista neighborhood. Presbyterians founded Trinity in 1869 in Tehuacana, Texas (about 40 miles NE of Waco) from the...

read more
The Not-A-Frog Bridge in Brackenridge Park

The Not-A-Frog Bridge in Brackenridge Park

After the Texas Trail Roundup Sunday walk someone asked us about San Antonio's "Frog Bridge." Actually, it's a TOAD bridge (although everyone calls it the frog bridge. Goes to show what we know.) The city commissioned ceramicist Diana Kersey to decorate a new bridge...

read more
The Little Train in the Big Park

The Little Train in the Big Park

Since 1957, the San Antonio Zoo Eagle has chugged along the tracks skirting the banks of the San Antonio River in Brackenridge Park, on the route of the longer Sunday walks of the Texas Trail Roundup.  Stops include the Witte Museum, Kiddie Park, and the Japanese Tea...

read more
Alamo Stadium Murals: a WPA Project

Alamo Stadium Murals: a WPA Project

During the 20k+ walk on Sunday, the Texas Trail Roundup takes you by Alamo Stadium at 110 Tuleta, across the street from Trinity University. If you have a spare moment, check out the murals at the west entrance. The federal Work Progress Administration (WPA)...

read more

The post Japanese Tea Garden Walk, 23 November, 2019 appeared first on Texas Trail Roundup.

]]>
2733
Featured YRE: Beat the Heat at North Star Mall, 31 August, 2019 http://texastrailroundup.org/2019/08/18/featured-yre-beat-the-heat-at-north-star-mall-31-august-2019/ Sun, 18 Aug 2019 13:00:45 +0000 http://texastrailroundup.org/?p=2743 DOWNLOAD THE BROCHURE THIS IS A FEATURED YEAR-ROUND EVENT  You can walk in the North Star Mall ANY Day (use our online Start Box.) This is the ONE day a year we have a human being on site to stamp your books! We offer a 10 km (four loops) and 5 km (2 loops) walk […]

The post Featured YRE: Beat the Heat at North Star Mall, 31 August, 2019 appeared first on Texas Trail Roundup.

]]>
DOWNLOAD THE BROCHURE

THIS IS A FEATURED YEAR-ROUND EVENT  You can walk in the North Star Mall ANY Day (use our online Start Box.) This is the ONE day a year we have a human being on site to stamp your books!

We offer a 10 km (four loops) and 5 km (2 loops) walk in the North Star Mall. We will register walkers at the Taco Cabana at 7339 San Pedro Ave, San Antonio, TX 78216 between 9 a.m. and noon. The fee is $3 per walker.

After registering and stamping your books, drive across the street and park anywhere in the ample parking around the North Star Mall. Note where you enter the mall to start the walk, as this will be also be where you exit the mall at the end of your walk.

Bathrooms are on the 2nd floor. Fine dining and exciting shopping opportunities abound. Enjoy the year-round safe and comfortable walking environment.
COME WALK WITH US!

DIRECTIONS TO THE START POINT: Taco Cabana at 7339 San Pedro Ave, San Antonio, TX 78216 On 410 heading east toward the airport, take exit 20. Turn RIGHT on San Pedro. Turn RIGHT on Rector and then LEFT into the Taco Cabana parking lot. On 410 heading west from the airport, take San Pedro Exit. Turn LEFT on San Pedro. Turn RIGHT on Rector and then LEFT into the Taco Cabana parking lot.

The post Featured YRE: Beat the Heat at North Star Mall, 31 August, 2019 appeared first on Texas Trail Roundup.

]]>
2743